NOUN-CASE



Case denotes the relation of a noun or a pronoun to other words in a sentence.

In English, there are three cases :

  1. Nominative Case or Subjective case.
  2. Objective Case.
  3. Possessive Case or Genitive case.


Nominative Case

When a noun is used as subject of the verb in a sentence, it is in nominative case.

For example :

John writes an essay.
John is the subject and in the nominative case.


Objective Case

When a noun is used as an object of the verb in a sentence, it is in objective case.

For examples:

1. He eats an apple.
2. we play cricket.
3. I write a letter.
4. John cooks food.

apple, cricket, letter, food are the objects and in the objective case.


Possessive Case

In the possessive case, a noun shows possession or ownership.

For examples :

  1. Singular noun takes apostraphe ('s) to form possessive case;
    Examples: Harry's ball, John's brother, etc.
  2. If the noun is plural and ends in 's', the possessive case is formed by apostrophe alone;
    Examples: Boys' hostel, Horses' race, etc.
  3. When the noun is plural and does not end in 's', the possessive case is formed by adding apostrophe ('s);
    Examples: Men's show, Children's ground, etc.



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